Condensed Volume 6 Book 2 Chapter 1

Book II Theory Applied CHAPTER I LIBERAL EDUCATION IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS I NEED not waste time in attempting to convince the reader of what we all know, that a liberal education is, like justice, religion, liberty, fresh air, the natural birthright of every child. Neither need we discuss the scope of such an education. We are aware that good life implies cultivated intelligence,… Educated teachers … Continue reading Condensed Volume 6 Book 2 Chapter 1

Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 3b

III THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE UNIVERSE (b) MATHEMATICS The question of Arithmetic and of Mathematics generally is one of great import to us as educators. We take strong ground when we appeal to the beauty and truth of Mathematics; that, as Ruskin points out, two and two make four and cannot conceivably make five, is an inevitable law. It is a great thing to be … Continue reading Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 3b

Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 3a

III THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE UNIVERSE (a) SCIENCE … science teaching in the schools should be of the nature of ‘common information’ is of use in defining our limitations in regard to the teaching of science. We find another limitation in the fact that children’s minds are not in need of the mental gymnastics that such teaching is supposed to afford. They are entirely alert … Continue reading Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 3a

Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 2f

II THE KNOWLEDGE OF MAN f) ART THERE are few subjects regarded with more respect and less confidence in our schools than this of ‘Art.’ Of course, we say, children should have their artistic powers cultivated, especially those who have such powers, but how is the question. The neat solution offered by South Kensington in the sixties,—freehand drawing, perspective, drawing from the round, has long … Continue reading Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 2f

Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 2e

II THE KNOWLEDGE OF MAN (e) LANGUAGES English is rather a logical study dealing with sentences and the positions that words occupy in them than with words and what they are in their own right. Therefore it is better that a child should begin with a sentence and not with the parts of speech, that is, he should learn a little of what is called … Continue reading Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 2e

Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 2d

II THE KNOWLEDGE OF MAN (d) COMPOSITION COMPOSITION in Form I (A and B) is almost entirely oral and is so much associated with Bible history, English history, geography, natural history, that it hardly calls for a special place on the programme, where however it does appear as ‘Tales.’ In few things do certain teachers labour in vain more than in the careful and methodical … Continue reading Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 2d

Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 2c

THE KNOWLEDGE OF MAN (c) MORALS AND ECONOMICS: CITIZENSHIP LIKE Literature this subject, too, is ancillary to History. In Form I, children begin to gather conclusions as to the general life of the community from tales, fables and the story of one or another great citizen. In Form II, Citizenship becomes a definite subject rather from the point of view of what may be called … Continue reading Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 2c

Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 2b Literature

II THE KNOWLEDGE OF MAN (b) LITERATURE EXCEPT in Form I [*age 6-9] the study of Literature goes pari passu [at an equal pace, hand in hand] with that of History. Fairy tales…delight Form IB [*age 6-7], and the little people re-tell these tales copiously, vividly, and with the astonishing exactness we may expect when we remember how seriously annoyed they are with the story-teller … Continue reading Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 2b Literature

Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 2a

THE KNOWLEDGE OF MAN (a) HISTORY I HAVE already spoken of history as a vital part of education… To us in particular who are living in one of the great epochs of history it is necessary to know something of what has gone before in order to think justly of what is occurring to-day. And, alas, this indifference to history is not confined to the … Continue reading Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 10 Section 2a