Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 5

CONDENSED CHAPTER V THE SACREDNESS OF PERSONALITY These principles (i.e., authority and docility) are limited by the respect due to the personality of children which may not be encroached upon whether by the direct use of fear or love, suggestion or influence, or by undue play upon any one natural desire. PEOPLE are too apt to use children as counters in a game, to be … Continue reading Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 5

A Philosophy of Education Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 5

CHAPTER V THE SACREDNESS OF PERSONALITY These principles (i.e., authority and docility) are limited by the respect due to the personality of children which may not be encroached upon whether by the direct use of fear or love, suggestion or influence, or by undue play upon any one natural desire. PEOPLE are too apt to use children as counters in a game, to be moved … Continue reading A Philosophy of Education Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 5

Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 4

CHAPTER IV  Authority and Docility The principles of Authority on the one hand and Docility on the other are natural, necessary and fundamental This deputed authority appearsto be lodged in everyone, ready for occasion. Every king and commander, every mother, elder sister, school prefect, every foreman of works and captain of games, finds that within himself which secures faithful obedience, not for the sake of … Continue reading Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 4

A Philosophy of Education Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 4

CHAPTER IV  Authority and Docility The principles of Authority on the one hand and Docility on the other are natural, necessary and fundamental THE War has made surprises stale but in those remote pre-war days we were enormously startled by the discovery of wireless telegraphy. That communications should pass through almost infinite space without sign or sound or obvious channel and arrive instantly at their … Continue reading A Philosophy of Education Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 4

Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 3

CHAPTER III THE GOOD AN D EVIL NATURE OF A CHILD Children are not born bad but with possibilities for good and for evil.I.—WELL-BEING OF BODY A well-known educationalist has brought heavy charges against us all on the score that we bring up children as ‘children of wrath.’ He probably exaggerates the effect of any such teaching, and the ‘little angel’ theory is fully as … Continue reading Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 3

A Philosophy of Education Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 3

CHAPTER III THE GOOD AND EVIL NATURE OF A CHILD Children are not born bad but with possibilities for good and for evil. I.—WELL-BEING OF BODY A well-known educationalist has brought heavy charges against us all on the score that we bring up children as ‘children of wrath.’ He probably exaggerates the effect of any such teaching, and the ‘little angel’ theory is fully as … Continue reading A Philosophy of Education Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 3

Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 2

CHILDREN ARE BORN PERSONS I.—The Mind of a Child The completeness of the new baby brother is what children admire most, his toes and his fingers, his ears and all the small perfections of him. But is the baby more than a ‘huge oyster’? ? That is the problem before us and hithertop.34educators have been inclined to answer it in the negative. Their notion is … Continue reading Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 2

A Philosophy of Education Volume 6 Book I Chapter 2

CHAPTER II CHILDREN ARE BORN PERSONS I.—THE MIND OF A CHILD           “No sooner doth the truth . . . . come into the soul’s sight, but the soul knows her to be her first and old acquaintance.”          “ The consequence of truth is great, therefore the judgment of it must not be negligent.” IT should not surprise the reader that a chapter, designed to … Continue reading A Philosophy of Education Volume 6 Book I Chapter 2

Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 1

SELF-EDUCATION limbs trained to grace and agility, a hand, to dexterity and precision, an eye made to see and an ear to hear, a voice taught to interpret,—we know to-day that all these possibilities of joy in living should be open to every child, and we look forward even too hopefully to the manner of citizen who shall be the outcome of our educational zeal. … Continue reading Condensed Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 1

A Philosophy of Education Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 1

Book I CHAPTER I SELF-EDUCATION THE title of this chapter may awaken some undeserved sympathy; gratifying visions of rhythmic movements, independent action, self-expression in various interesting ways, occur to the mind—for surely these things constitute ‘self-education’? Most of these modern panacea are desirable and by no means to be neglected; limbs trained to grace and agility, a hand, to dexterity and precision, an eye made … Continue reading A Philosophy of Education Volume 6 Book 1 Chapter 1